UNESCO-NIE Centre for Arts Research in Education (CARE)

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Journal: 
Australian Art Education
Name(s) of Author/Editor(s): 
Adele Flood
Refereed: 
Yes
Volume No.: 
32
Issue No.: 
1
Page numbers of article: 
4-15
Year of publication: 
2009
Country of publication: 
Australia
Country of Research Data: 
Australia
Language: 
English
Abstract: 

This article is a response to the statement 'Child art is dead', which was made to art educators at the 32nd Insea World Congress in Osaka. The author suggests that children have always made and will continue to make images that were meaningful for them: creating their images from a conglomeration of influences that surround them. The author considers that it is misguided to suggest that child art is dead in the 21st century, but that it is easy to see there are many situations that are causing the demise of art as a critical avenue of learning for students. The author argues that it is essential that art education is considered to be core learning within a curriculum. To do this art educators must help those outside the field understand that the higher order thinking benefits of enabling engagement and involvement are essential to all individuals being taught, not just those pursuing an artistic career. The author concludes that the narratives that are embedded within a child's art works are invaluable windows into their growing minds and bodies.

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